More about the Kyushu earthquakes

What do you like to do while riding in a train?  Look out the window?  Read?

I like to do both.

Recently I took a train ride, so I read about the recent earthquake damage in Kyushu in the children’s newspaper. (Kodomo Asahi Shinbun)

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This says that over forty people were killed.  (This number may be higher now.  I’m not sure.)

 

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This article says the bullet train derailed during one of the earthquakes (presumably the first large one.)  Nobody was killed, fortunately, and I have since heard on the television news that the bullet train is now running properly again.

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This explains the main plates.  As you can see in the illustration of Japan, there are four plates moving in different directions.

Underneath that illustration, there is a graph which tells the major earthquakes in Japan in recent years.  I’ll explain the graph:

1995  Magnitude 7.3  Kobe:  You probably weren’t born yet, but in 1995, there was a major earthquake in the area of Kobe City.  Lots of people were killed.

2004  Magnitude 6.8 Niigata:  Then in 2004, there was a strong earthquake in the Niigata Prefecture area.

2011 Magnitude 9.0  Tohoku:  You probably remember the next one:  In 2011, there was a huge earthquake off the coast of Japan which resulted in a devastating tsunami.

2016  Magnitude 6.5  Kyushu:  And then finally, the recent earthquakes in Kyushu.  They actually had two major earthquakes.  The second was more than Magnitude 7, I believe.

Do you live in an area with earthquakes?  It’s scary, isn’t it.

All Japanese live with the knowledge that there is a possibility of an earthquake at any time.   They combat their fears by preparation:  strong buildings and other structures, emergency supplies, drills, emergency plans, and so on.    They want to be prepared when the next one hits.

And then also in Japan,  there is a bit of “Shikata ga nai…..”  That means “It can’t be helped….”

Whatever will happen—–will happen.

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