One of the first news reports in Japan concerning meltdown situation at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant…

This is a youtube video from a recording of when there was first obvious (seen by the eye) trouble at the Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant located on the coast of Fukushima Prefecture.

I’ll translate using my own translation.

This is from about 4:30 p.m. on March 12 of 2011, so it was one full day after the quake struck.


The title of the video is: Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Vapor Explosion

WOMAN:

This is a video of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant at 3:36 this afternoon.

What seems to be water vapor is coming out of the plant. It is coming out of the vicinity of the plant’s Reactor One.

In the video, you can see Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant’s Reactor One Building on the left. What seems to be water vapor is coming out of it.

Now a new news report…

YOUNG MAN:

Yes. We received a report from Fukushima that something is going on at the nuclear power plant…A short while ago, the video began to be shown. (Turns to older man) It looks like there was something like an explosion of smoke that was rising?

OLDER MAN:

Yes. As was explained earlier, something called a squib valve*, it was destroyed, how do I explain this–a thing like a disc, was destroyed, a type of valve that lets things flow.

YOUNG MAN:

For example, can you explanation using this diagram?

OLDER MAN:

It’s not written on this.

YOUNG MAN:

Yes. This square casement–

OLDER MAN: (he’s pointing at the diagram)

It usually comes from this line here, it’s called a “stack.”An exhaust pipes comes out here. That exhaust pipe has a filter. In that case, not all of the radioactive particles come out (into the air.) Ninety or ninety-five percent is pulled back down by gravity. So very little moves out.

And then I don’t know–It’s something that is important, what is called a “squib valve” is used. That’s steam (water vapor) coming out, steam, I think…

YOUNG MAN:

Ah, steam?

OLDER MAN:

I think it is steam.

YOUNG MAN:

That’s steam in that video.

OLDER MAN:

Yes–it has exploded–and that’s steam–I think that’s steam coming out.

YOUNG MAN:

So it’s steam. So it was released intentionally…? (意図的???I think I’m hearing the right word.)

OLDER MAN:

Yes, I think it was intentional.

YOUNG MAN:

So it was intentional.

OLDER MAN:

Normally it comes from the stack sticking up, the chimney–

YOUNG MAN:

And that’s in the middle of the screen–

OLDER MAN:

Yes, in the middle. It has a filter and exhaust is released there. I think this will not have a great influence. (影響力出るもない)

YOUNG MAN:

Professor, have you had experience in this before?

OLDER MAN:

No, I don’t know how it is released. It’s not a regular sort of thing to use a squib valve. I don’t know.

YOUNG WOMAN:

So this is something that is only done when it is urgent–

OLDER MAN:

Yes, I think it’s being done because it’s urgent.

YOUNG MAN:

Just before, we heard from a Fukushima report that the radiation level is twenty times greater than normal.

OLDER MAN:

Yes Possibly that amount was released from the filter all at once and there’s a possibility it will increase.

YOUNG MAN:

The video we are watching is not live. It was taken this afternoon at 3:36, in the afternoon at 3:36. That was about one hour ago–

YOUNG WOMAN:

And twenty minutes–

YOUNG MAN:

One hour and twenty minutes ago. This is what happened one hour and twenty minutes ago at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. Uh–Gas was let out, violently like that (VIDEO OF EXPLOSION SHOWN ON THE SCREEN)

OLDER MAN:

When it was let out, it was from 0.75 MegaPasquals to 0.55 MegaPasquals comma about  0. 0.2 MegaPasquals, so about two atomospheric pressures (二気圧?), and so for this-Bang! It went down.

YOUNG MAN:

To the end, a thing called a squib valve can be used, but there isn’t one, and it is used to lower pressure.

What do you think the risk is?

OLDER MAN:

Uhhh–I believe that the very worst risk is that the nuclear power will cause destruction, and if we can avoid that, it will be a success.

Before this, how do I say this, the stack (unintelligible to me) we couldn’t take it out.

YOUNG MAN:

We just received a report. According to Tokyo Electric Power Plant, it is announced that nothing is out of the ordinary with the nuclear reactor.

OLDER MAN:

The meaning of “nothing is out of the ordinary with the nuclear reactor” is–we can take the meaning of there is not enough (unintelligible.) The most worrisome is that it’s that NOT that nothing is out of the ordinary. If there is nothing is out of the ordinary, there will be no harm.

YOUNG MAN:

This was what happened at 3:36. And now after this, for safety, people who live within a ten kilometer radius have been called to evacuate.

OLDER MAN:

Yes. Yes.

YOUNG MAN:

Thank you very much.

YOUNG WOMAN:

Thank you very much.

YOUNG MAN:

Now we have a report from Miyagi Prefecture.

*In Japanese, a squib valve is “bakuhaben” and yes, I did have to look this word up.


Please note that I tried to translate it as literally as possible and that’s why it doesn’t flow as well as English does to English speakers. I hope I did an accurate translation. There were a few parts that were technical (and also the older man was a rather fast and mumbly speaker) so those parts were hard for me to figure out.

 

About kireikireikireiI am a mom.

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